Wednesday, January 29, 2014

Oklahoma Rep Jadine Nollan Re: HB 1835 Marijuana Punishment bill

 Along with the much hype about legalization of marijuana in Oklahoma there is a much less talked about, HB 1835 that looks to reduce the penalty for possession of Marijuana. Please feel free to write your Rep...here was my response.
 
Jadine Nollan Jadine.Nollan@okhouse.gov
8:24 AM (19 hours ago)

to me
ProgressiveOkie,

Thank you for your thoughts and comments.  I will keep them under advisement.  You are absolutely right about our prisons being over crowded.  I believe we do need to look at our non violent offenders policy.

Highest Regards,

Rep.  Jadine Nollan

Sent from my iPad

> On Jan 27, 2014, at 2:59 AM , ProgressiveOkie> wrote:
>
>
> Jan 27, 2014
>
> Representative Jadine Nollan
> State Capitol Building, Room 329-A
> 2300 North Lincoln Boulevard
> Oklahoma City, OK 73105
>
> Dear Representative Nollan,
>
> The House Public Safety Committee recently voted unanimously in favor
> of HB 1835, a bill that would amend penalties for possession of
> marijuana in Oklahoma. Presently, our laws are some of the harshest in
> the nation.
>
> HB 1835 would classify first and second offenses for marijuana
> possession as misdemeanors. Under current law, first-time offenses for
> possession are unclassified, and subsequent offenses are felonies with
> two to 10 years of possible jail time. I've seen reports that our state
> has a serious problem with prison overcrowding. Last year, Justin
> Jones, director of the Oklahoma Department of Correction, said he
> doesn't think the state can go any lower with its staff to prisoner
> ratio. He said there isn't enough money to keep up with the volume of
> prisoners.
>
> We only have so many resources in our state, and we should reserve
> two-year prison terms for people who victimize others, not people who
> use a substance that more than 100 million adults in the U.S. have
> tried at least once.
>
> This harsh punishment does not fit the non-violent crime of possessing
> marijuana. Please support HB 1835. Thank you.
>
> Sincerely,

ProgressiveOkie

Monday, January 27, 2014

Marijuana Law reform for Oklahoma in 2014

Lots of stories in the news in papers and on TV. All of the Oklahoma groups for Marijuana reform are reporting more turnout and interest. It really seems like an exciting time for reforming Marijuana in Oklahoma. I've tried to provide a good starting point if you'd like to know whats going on...


Support Constance Johnson 's bill to Legalize marijuana. Sign the petition here. http://norml.org/news/2014/01/21/oklahoma-marijuana-legalization

Oklahoma: Marijuana Legalization Measure Introduced

Oklahoma: Marijuana Legalization Measure Introduced State Senator Constance Johnson (D-District 48) has introduced Senate Bill 2116, which aims to legalize the possession, cultivation, and retail sale of cannabis to adults. The proposed legislation removes all criminal and civil penalties for the possession of up to one ounce of marijuana and the personal cultivation of up to 5 marijuana plants by those over the age of 21. The bill would also create a system of retail cannabis outlets, cultivation facilities, and marijuana product manufacturers. You can read the full text of the measure here.
"I think we need to accept the realities that alcohol is a dangerous drug, prescription drugs are dangerous. Marijuana has not killed anyone," stated Senator Johnson.
Oklahoma presently possesses some of the strictest marijuana penalties in the nation. A second offense for minor marijuana possession is classified as felony, punishable by up to ten years incarceration. Cultivation of any amount of cannabis is also classified as a felony and may be punishable by up to life in prison.
According to a 2013 ACLU report, Oklahoma arrests over 10,000 individuals for simple marijuana possession every year, at the cost nearly 30 million dollars. These arrests disproportionately impact minorities. Despite only constituting 7.6% of the state's population and having similar use rates to their white counterparts, African Americans account for 20.8% of the state's marijuana possession arrests.
Please take a moment of your time to easily contact your elected officials in support of this important legislation.
http://salsa3.salsalabs.com/o/51046/p/dia/action3/common/public/?action_KEY=12848


  H.B. 1835, sponsored by Rep. Cory Williams (D-34), would make first and second offense possession of marijuana a misdemeanor. Subsequent offenses would remain a felony, but the possible jail time would be reduced to a maximum of five years.

If you live in Oklahoma, please ask your representative to support this sensible reform.
- See more at: http://cannabisculturenews.com/2014/01/oklahoma-to-consider-lessening-marijuana-penalties/#sthash.AECYQTSr.dpuf


According to latest SoonerPoll results, Oklahomans are ready to consider marijuana for medicinal purposes and decriminalization. The poll had support for medical marijuana at 71% and support for decriminalization at 57%. The poll did not ask about legalization.


In addition, two of Johnson’s marijuana-related bills from the 2013 session still are alive, including SB 710, which would legalize medical marijuana.
SB 914 would decriminalize possession of less than an ounce in any situation.


Also coming up Oklahoma legislators will get a different look during a Feb. 12 hearing to discuss scientific evidence about the medical use of cannabis extracts, and listen to families who wish it could be obtained in Oklahoma.

The subject to be discussed has nothing to do with smoking, and it is not a substance people would use to get high. The product that will be discussed is an oil very low in THC — the psychotropic compound of cannabis that produces its notorious “high.”

Instead, the product is produced from cannabis plants specifically bred for a high level of cannabidiol — a compound with a calming effect on the brain. The United States Department of Health and Human Services has itself held a patent on cannabinoids as antioxidants and neuroprotectants since 2003.

H.B. 1835, sponsored by Rep. Cory Williams (D-34), would make first and second offense possession of marijuana a misdemeanor. Subsequent offenses would remain a felony, but the possible jail time would be reduced to a maximum of five years - See more at: http://cannabisculturenews.com/2014/01/oklahoma-to-consider-lessening-marijuana-penalties/#sthash.AECYQTSr.dpuf
H.B. 1835, sponsored by Rep. Cory Williams (D-34), would make first and second offense possession of marijuana a misdemeanor. Subsequent offenses would remain a felony, but the possible jail time would be reduced to a maximum of five years.
If you live in Oklahoma, please ask your representative to support this sensible reform.
Although this change is modest, it is still a significant improvement over the status quo. It’s a change that makes both common sense and fiscal sense. It would mean fewer adults would be jailed simply for choosing to use a substance less harmful than alcohol. It would also free up prison space for people who commit serious and violent crimes.
- See more at: http://cannabisculturenews.com/2014/01/oklahoma-to-consider-lessening-marijuana-penalties/#sthash.AECYQTSr.dpuf
. H.B. 1835, sponsored by Rep. Cory Williams (D-34), would make first and second offense possession of marijuana a misdemeanor. Subsequent offenses would remain a felony, but the possible jail time would be reduced to a maximum of five years.
If you live in Oklahoma, please ask your representative to support this sensible reform.
- See more at: http://cannabisculturenews.com/2014/01/oklahoma-to-consider-lessening-marijuana-penalties/#sthash.AECYQTSr.dpuf

sponsored by Rep. Cory Williams (D-34), would make first and second offense possession of marijuana a misdemeanor. Subsequent offenses would remain a felony, but the possible jail time would be reduced to a maximum of five years. - See more at: http://cannabisculturenews.com/2014/01/oklahoma-to-consider-lessening-marijuana-penalties/#sthash.AECYQTSr.dpuf
H.B. 1835, sponsored by Rep. Cory Williams (D-34), would make first and second offense possession of marijuana a misdemeanor. Subsequent offenses would remain a felony, but the possible jail time would be reduced to a maximum of five years - See more at: http://cannabisculturenews.com/2014/01/oklahoma-to-consider-lessening-marijuana-penalties/#sthash.AECYQTSr.dpuf

Thursday, January 9, 2014

End Mary Fallin's Reign of terror with Tulsa Democrats and Joe Dorman


This week in Tulsa- Meet the Democrats pick to run against Mary Fallin.


  • Rep Joe Dorman - Candidate for Governor of Oklahoma
  • Friday, January 10th 2014
  • Baxter's Interurban Grill - 717 South Houston Ave
  • 12:00pm - 1:00pm
  • Come hear why we need stronger leadership in the Governor's mansion & how you can get involved with Joe's Campaign!
  • Click here to see the Facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/371835689618384/ 
  • Please RSVP to info@tulsacountydemocrats.org

Tom Coburn:" NSA's egregious, unacceptable violations were not allowed to continue—they were corrected"

Correspondence from Sen. Coburn over NSA's liberty violations.

Thank you for your email regarding National Security Agency (NSA) programs in relation to Americans’ constitutional rights. It is good to hear from you.
 
The War on Terror is being fought not only in foreign lands, but within our country. We must be cautious not to give away our freedom in the name of national security, but I believe we can balance our national security and the freedoms we enjoy to ensure that an attack, such as the ones that occurred on September 11, 2001—never happens again.
 
As long as I have served in Congress, my top priority has been to protect Americans’ constitutional rights. Whether it has been protecting Americans from legislation which would infringe on their Second Amendment rights, United Nations treaties which infringe on our nation’s sovereignty, or unconstitutional Obama Administration policies, I have, and will continue, to ensure Americans rights and freedoms are protected.
 
There has been considerable speculation in the press about a number of NSA programs after the unauthorized disclosure of classified information by NSA contractor Edward Snowden. I understand why many Americans were outraged upon first hearing about the programs, but much of the information reported has been inaccurate and incomplete. As a member of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, I have provided oversight on these programs for a number of years, and I do not believe the fundamental structure of the program infringes upon the constitutional rights of American citizens. As you know, mistakes and violations have occurred at the NSA have been reported. These violations were not allowed to continue—they were corrected. Furthermore, these mistakes and violations were egregious, unacceptable, and must never be tolerated from any government agency.
 
As a member of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence and the ranking member of the Committee on Homeland Security and Government Affairs, my top priority is to protect and defend the Constitution and the rights of American citizens. I will continue to oppose all legislation and government programs that threaten Americans’ freedom and liberty.
 
Again, thank you for your input on this important topic. God bless.
 
Sincerely,
Tom A. Coburn, M.D.
United States Senator
 
TC: jw

Seems like a funny thing to claim that NSA violations were corrected. The president hasn't even acted on his commission's recommendations yet, we should hear about those in the coming weeks before his SOTU address where I'm guessing he will pivot to the mid-term strategy of income-inequality. 

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